TV Shows We’re Tired of Hearing About

“Dude, you have to watch this show,” said all of us. We each have our favorite TV shows, which are the favorite shows of millions of other people. We watch them, regurgitate our surprise or awe for an episode via social media, and when someone admits to us that they haven’t watched it, all of a sudden we’re missionaries spreading gospel to aboriginals.

I’ve been guilty of this, and I’ve also been the aboriginal handed the mysterious leather bound book. The more I’m recommended a show, the less I want to see it, and when I finally get to watching it, my expectations are sometimes too high to truly enjoy it, or I approach it with stubborn skepticism to be contrary to the trend. Suppress your enthusiasm friends and allow others to approach these TV shows organically, out of genuine interest and not because they’re being told to.

Here are some shows that we need to stop force-feeding people:

Breaking Bad

Most of us will agree that this is an exceptional show. It got crazy popular through Netflix which allowed people to catch up prior to new seasons, constantly compounding their fanbase and hauling in insane ratings. I feel bad for the few people who were made to listen to the hysteria while being outside of it. Now that it’s all over and the dust has settled, they might feel like there is little point in getting into it anymore.

Mad Men

A former boss of mine used to say about Mad Men, “I watch it every week, but I don’t know why. Nothing happens.” That feels like a pretty fair assessment of what is considered by many, including myself, to be a groundbreaking program. It’s a fascinating culture and character study with impeccable writing and acting, which makes it really engaging. And things “happen,” but not in the way things “happen” in Breaking Bad. It’s slower paced and more cerebral, which people should know before getting into it to avoid disappointment.

True Detective

Super creepy, skillfully written, well directed and well acted. Everything you want from a neo-noir crime drama set in Louisiana. This new anthology series is a very recent phenomenon that made a name for itself right out of the gate with leads like Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson. Audiences were highly engrossed, lending their theories, speculations, and praise every week. Worth the hype, but it was thoroughly overhyped.

The Wire

Possibly one of the most influential TV shows of the last decade, it’s one of those shows that got great reviews but fewer ratings during the time of its air. If you’re caught in a conversation with a Wire fan about the show, prepare for a college style lecture. If you think I’m exaggerating, Rutgers University recently introduced a class on The Wire.

Game of Thrones

This is the show I haven’t seen. I’m sure it’s great. I’m sure the books are better. I don’t think I care to get into either. The “OMG Red Wedding!!!!!” posts only lead to non-viewers seeking out the assistance of Wikipedia and YouTube to ease the sense of isolation. I watched the Red Wedding scene. I wasn’t impressed. I know it’s because I’m not invested in the series, but I’m sort of glad I’m not.