Home Blogs Foods High in Vitamin C to Eat Right Now

Foods High in Vitamin C to Eat Right Now

by Abby Montanez

Come cold and flu season (or if you happen to find yourself in the midst of a pandemic), you might have the inclination to start loading your body up with vitamin C. The essential nutrient has been known mostly for its immune-boosting powers, and can be consumed via supplements or in the very things we eat and drink. We’re not just talking about citrus fruits, either. There are a number of foods high in vitamin C from peppers and potatoes to broccoli and kiwi. Despite a number of false claims that mega doses of vitamin C could protect you from COVID-19, it wouldn’t hurt to make sure you’re getting the daily recommended value of the nutrient anyway.

Why is vitamin C important?

As I mentioned, vitamin C is widely known for its ability to support a healthy immune system. Not only can it stimulate the production of white blood cells that ward off infections and diseases, vitamin C can also promote heart health, form collagen, reduce inflammation and increase iron absorption in the body.

Foods High in Vitamin C

What’s the recommended allowance?

The Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) for an adult man or woman is anywhere from 70mg-90mg of vitamin C. Meaning if you normally eat foods high in vitamin C, there’s typically no need to take a supplement. For reference, one medium orange contains about 70mg. While again, it may be tempting to want to go overboard during these difficult times, an overconsumption of vitamin C could lead to uncomfortable side effects such as diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, headache and insomnia.

Which foods are high in vitamin C? (besides citrus)

Foods High in Vitamin C

A note on cooking:

Cooking can alter the effectiveness of certain nutrients. Vitamin C, for example, loses some of its value when it’s exposed to heat, therefore the longer you cook it, the more you lose. While keeping foods in a raw state is best, methods such as steaming or blanching give you better odds of retaining the food’s nutrients.

Main image by Bon Appetit /  Ted Cavanaugh

Related Articles

Leave a Comment